pho·tog·ra·phy

pho·tog·ra·phy

[fuh-tog-ruh-fee]

noun

1. the process or art of producing images of objects on sensitized surfaces by the chemical action of light or of other forms of radiant energy, as x-rays, gamma rays, or cosmic rays.

This is what the dictionary defines as photography. If you are a photographer, a person who takes photographs, professionally or otherwise, do you also practice the art of photography? Apparently, the two are mutually exclusive and you can be either/or.
What if you are a photographer who is new to photography? Maybe you haven’t had the experience of working in a darkroom, or maybe you feel shy to have your digital masterpieces printed. Well, there is only one way to remedy that.
As a lab that’s been around for a long time, it’s staff members even longer (oh dear), we have been through many transitions of photography. Collectively, we have seen the coming and going of film types, paper types, entire companies, and now an industry that some say is doomed.
I beg to differ.
The industry and our collective memories as recorded on photo paper is only doomed as long as we don’t practice the art of photography.
The art of image making is a language. Language is effective when spoken either with the mouth, hands, eyes or body. No matter what, it has to be externalized in order for someone to know what is being said. So you take an amazing image with your DSLR,  your old rangefinder, or even your iphone. Awesome. That’s the perfect place to begin, for there, you are creating a language. You are beginning the dialogue of the idea/discussion/thought/story you want to convey. Your children are playing in the puddle, your cat is bathing in the sun, a wedding is being celebrated.
So, how are you going to keep the conversation going?
A print. A photo album. A canvas mounted wall hanging.
Photography gives your moments a voice so strong, it will speak to all who encounter it for decades.